MORNING PRAYERS - 2019 3RD QUARTER

Friday, January 4th

The New Year can often bring a mixed bag of emotions and memories for many of us. Some may have just experienced the best year ever and look forward to an even greater one ahead. Others may have just trudged through one struggle after another. The fresh calendar year brings hope for things to be better.

 

Whether you’ve just walked through the greatest year or semester of your life, or are incredibly glad to see this one finally over, one truth still rings clear amidst it all. You are not alone. Not ever.

 

Our God is a “with us" God. On the heels of the celebration of the birth of Christ our King, that reminder has the power to carry us right into a fresh, new start. He is Immanuel, God with us. And though things and people around us shift and change, our God never does.

 

Let us pray

 

Dear God,

 

Thank you that you make all things new. We are grateful for all that you've allowed into our lives this past year, both the good and the bad, as they have reminded us how much we need you and rely on you. We pray for your Spirit to lead us each step of this New Year. May we always be aware of your presence among us so that we will know we are never alone. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

 

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Friday, January 4th - Davis Woodliff ‘19

In life we go through many different storms.  We go through storms as a result of: our friends, our family, school, extracurricular activities, and so many more.  But, what is the thing that gets us through these storms. Many people think that things like partying, juuling, smoking and many other things are the best ways to get through a storm.  However, what those things really do is just put that storm off to the side for a bit until the effects wear off making us face that storm again and again. But, what if instead of turning to worldly things to comfort us in a storm, we turn to God to end that storm.  Matthew 11:28 states “Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest”. Jesus, by stating this, is inviting you to give all of your baggage and struggles to him so that he can carry you through those hard times.

 

So today, BK. I encourage you to ask God to carry you through whichever storm you may be in.  Whether it be school, sports, a relationship, family, college, or anything along those lines. Ask God to carry you and see the good that comes out of that.

 

God, thank you so much for this day.  I pray that today the students and faculty at Bishop Kelley will lean on you to carry them through whatever storm they may be going through.  I also ask that you help them know that you are always there for them through the thick and thin,

 

I ask this through Christ Our Lord……Amen

 

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Thursday, January 10th - Sam Alaback ‘20

What a wonderful day today is. Wait.. is this guy OK? A WONDERFUL DAY?! That’s crazy talk. Everyone who came to school today most likely woke up super early as their alarm buzzed violently in their ear, had to slowly get out of bed, gather whatever clean clothes you could find, and now, after all that, have to listen to the morning prayer; even though you’ve heard it so many times that is just becomes muffled noise on the intercom.

 

What a wonderful day.

 

Now I know some of you think that way some mornings. I do as well. Bishop Kelley students, faculty, and staff, we are so blessed to be alive. Every day is a gift from God. Try not to think negatively about the tedious things, and instead, focus on the things that you’re blessed with. A loving sibling, a warm coat, a nice meal, a roof over your head. These are just a small amount of infinite things we could be blessed with. Why not focus on those? Man, today really is a wonderful day.

 

Let us pray. Father Almighty, maker of Heaven and Earth, just be being here at Bishop Kelley shows us how blessed we are. Open our eyes to see your love all around us, and help us focus on the nice things, and not cling on the bad. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

 

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Friday, January 11th - Monse Solorzano ‘19

Bishop Kelley, I know that I am not the only teenager out there that does not like driving. Don't get me wrong, I love my car and the freedom that comes with having a license, but sometimes people going ten under the speed limit or those who weave in and out of traffic tend to ruin the experience.

 

Driving also comes with the responsibility of knowing where to go, and to go safely. Thats where a GPS comes in handy.

 

At times we can compare our life to a car ride. We are in the driver's seat, and God is our GPS. He is telling us where to go, but whether we decide to follow His directions is up to us. If we decide to make a wrong left turn or take a different route is up to us, but we must always know that God will never steer us wrong. Maybe we will go down a lonely road with nothing to be seen, or He might lead us to hills, ups and downs, a winding path.  But we must keep in mind that He will always be there for us, whether we realize it or not.

 

Dear Lord, thank you for allowing us to awake to yet another beautiful day. I We are  grateful for the beauty of all of your creations. Despite sometimes forgetting to proclaim our thanks, we am overjoyed by the wonders around us. Thank you for our lives, through Christ our Lord, amen.

 

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Monday, January 14th - Leah Brainerd ‘20

Wherever you are in the world, you still look at  the same moon as someone on the other side. The moon in Tulsa is the same moon as the one in Hong Kong. The same is true for God. We all pray to the same God, no matter what specifics we believe, or how we choose to see him, God is God. He is all present and all knowing. And although we are one small part of the world, God still sees every one of us as a special individual. So today, thank God for always being there for you, especially in the hardest parts.

 

Let us pray,

Lord, thank you for sending your only son to die for us, and for your constancy in always taking care of us, especially in the hard times. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

 

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Tuesday, January 15th - Lillie Burke ‘19

High school is tough. I’m sure that sentence resonated with a lot of you, and there was probably a collective murmur of agreement echoing throughout the halls, but it’s true. High schoolers have a lot to deal with; school work, friend groups, high school drama, family life, social media, extracurriculars, and more are thrown at us constantly. Every day, it seems we are faced with a new challenge regarding a different aspect of our lives, and some days, these challenges are harder than others. During the rougher times, it can be hard to see the point… hard to see the light at the end of the tunnel. Some days, when everything seems to be spiraling around us, it can be hard to feel like you’re enough, and that, eventually, you will make it through. But let’s switch gears for a second. Now, I want you to close your eyes, and picture this: Jesus is standing before you. He looks at the cross… and then, He looks at you. “You’re worth it,” He says. Wow. Many times, especially in high school, we get so caught up in all the things that are going wrong, all the things that we can’t control, all the things that aren’t perfect, that we forget to take a moment to think about the things that we have been blessed with. We forget to appreciate life itself. Jesus died on the cross not so that we would suffer more, and not so that we would tear ourselves down for being imperfect, but for the exact opposite. He died so that we could fall in love with being alive, and so that we could fall in love with all aspects of ourselves. So Bishop Kelley, today I challenge you to remember this: you are not perfect, and life will not always go your way. Some days will be hard, but Jesus died so that we may live happily and freely. Jesus died because He knew that you were worth it, and at the end of the day, that is what matters. Not that one bad grade, not that you got in trouble with your parents, not that you and a friend got into a fight, and not that you don’t think you compare to the people you see online. What matters is that, to God, You are worth it.

 

Let us pray.

Dear Lord, help us to remember our importance when we start to feel unworthy. Remind us that the only thing that is truly perfect is You, and Your love for us. Help us remember that you made us to be exactly who we are, and that we are always enough in Your eyes. We ask this through Christ, our Lord, Amen.

 

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Wednesday, January 16th - Celeste McAtee ‘19

Several times a week, I go to work for a Christian jewelry company.  Every item I package bears the phrase “beauty, truth, and revolutionary joy.”  Most of us understand the importance of truth and joy in faith, but what about beauty?  What does beauty have to do with faith? Perhaps you think I mean prettiness. Prettiness is attractiveness at a surface-level, and while it is good and pleasing, it does not have much substance.  Beauty, on the other hand, is a reflection of the goodness of God. In his 1999 letter to artists, St. John Paul the second stated that “beauty is the visible form of the good.” God made a beautiful world, and although through sin we have made it imperfect, the goodness of God always prevails.  The world is beautiful because God loves us.  Sometimes it is difficult to see the beauty in the world around us.  And sometimes it's even more difficult to see the beauty within ourselves.  Again, I am not talking about prettiness. I am talking about our innate worth as the children of a wonderful God.  Yesterday Lillie presented us with an image of Jesus looking at the cross, and then looking at you individually, and telling you that you are worth it.  You are worth it because you are beautiful--you are the visible form of the goodness of God.

 

God, source of all beauty, thank you for your love.  Help us to never forget your amazing gifts, and lead us to share your beauty with all those around us.  We ask these things through Christ our Lord.

 

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Friday, January 17th - Mika Ramos ‘20

I have a natural tendency to want to be comfortable. Comfortable with the environment I’m in, the people around me, and more. However, comfortability may not always be a good thing. An article I read by Matt Slick challenged me by asking,  “Are you comfortable?  Do you feel safe in the Lord?  I hope so. You should. Comfort and peace are great blessings from the Lord.

 

Comfort can be a stumbling block when it robs us of our strength and dependence on God.  Think of a man who is so comfortable in his life with so few problems that he doesn't have to worry about anything.  He relaxes, enjoys life and becomes weak and dependent upon his routine and life. So too the Christian who is very comfortable in his life, can also become weak and dependent upon the securities of life instead of the Lord.  There is nothing wrong with being comfortable, unless that comfort makes us depend on God less and cause us to become complacent about the lost around us.”

 

So today Bishop Kelley, I encourage you to be uncomfortable in your faith. Challenge yourself, and you may be able to grow your faith in ways you didn’t expect.

 

Let us pray, Lord, we thank you for this beautiful day. We thank you for your love that never waivers, and the countless blessings that you place in our lives. Help us to grow our relationship with you, and glorify you in all that we do. In your name we pray, Amen.

 

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Friday, January 17th - Mika Ramos ‘20

Have you ever pondered what the joyful mysteries of the Rosary have in common?  The annunciation of the angel Gabriel to Mary nine months before Jesus’ birth, the visitation of Mary to Elizabeth, the nativity of Jesus, the presentation of Jesus at the temple, and the finding of Jesus at the temple certainly are all joyful events for us Christians.  But that’s not all. In each of these moments, we see just how close Mary is to her son. Mary welcomes Jesus, celebrates that he is on the way, brings him into the world, receives Simeon’s blessing with him, and – after losing him for a few days – reunites with him.

Maybe that is all we really need to ponder at the beginning of this day of prayer for the legal protection of unborn children.  She and her Son model for us the most awesome love on earth that we could possibly imagine. So why not try to imitate it? In a world that in so many ways seeks to separate and isolate parents from children and children from parents, why not do everything we can to help all parents – moms and dads – protect their children from everything that would harm them?  Why not do something special today for your own parents, whether far or near, living or deceased? One thing we can do right now is pray.

 

Let us pray.  Heavenly Father, you have given us the great gift of life through the great gift of our parents.  As we pray today for protection for all unborn children, help us to honor our parents, and to do what we can to help all parents choose life for their children.  Amen.

 

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Tuesday, January 22nd - Mr. Tim Wymore

Have you ever pondered what the joyful mysteries of the Rosary have in common?  The annunciation of the angel Gabriel to Mary nine months before Jesus’ birth, the visitation of Mary to Elizabeth, the nativity of Jesus, the presentation of Jesus at the temple, and the finding of Jesus at the temple certainly are all joyful events for us Christians.  But that’s not all. In each of these moments, we see just how close Mary is to her son. Mary welcomes Jesus, celebrates that he is on the way, brings him into the world, receives Simeon’s blessing with him, and – after losing him for a few days – reunites with him.

Maybe that is all we really need to ponder at the beginning of this day of prayer for the legal protection of unborn children.  She and her Son model for us the most awesome love on earth that we could possibly imagine. So why not try to imitate it? In a world that in so many ways seeks to separate and isolate parents from children and children from parents, why not do everything we can to help all parents – moms and dads – protect their children from everything that would harm them?  Why not do something special today for your own parents, whether far or near, living or deceased? One thing we can do right now is pray.

 

Let us pray.  Heavenly Father, you have given us the great gift of life through the great gift of our parents.  As we pray today for protection for all unborn children, help us to honor our parents, and to do what we can to help all parents choose life for their children.  Amen.

 

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Wednesday, January 23rd - Parker Ross ‘19

In Mark chapter 6 verse 7 the bible says “this people honors me with their lips, but their hearts are far from me” Jesus despised hypocrisy. He had little time for what we call “fake” people who pretended obey and follow the laws but who in their hearts were far from being faithful. Jesus was less concerned that people follow the law to the last detail than that they love with their hearts. Sometimes it is easy for us to act like a Christian, but when it comes to treating people as we would like to be treated, we totally fail. Or we exhibit all the external signs of being a Christian, but never reach out to others and care for them as Jesus calls us to do. So today Bishop Kelley, I challenge you to be genuine.

 

Let us pray. Dear God, enable us to live with integrity , incorporating your values into our hearts and making our lives a genuine witness to your good news. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

 

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Tuesday, January 29th

The reason we will celebrate an All School Mass today is because it is National Catholic Schools Week. In the  U.S., we have celebrated Catholic Schools Week since 1974. Did you know that nearly 1.8 million students are currently educated in over 6,000 Catholic schools in the United States, and there are 4200 students in our 13 schools in the DIocese of Tulsa. Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI  says that, “Education is integral to the mission of the Church to proclaim the Good News. First and foremost every Catholic educational institution is a place to encounter the living God who in Jesus Christ reveals his transforming love and truth.”Through the years, the benefits of a Catholic education have been studied and well-documented, showing that  students who attend Catholic schools receive a challenging, high-quality academic experience in a supportive environment, with an emphasis on Catholic values and college preparation. As a result, Catholic Schools Week is a good time to remember how fortunate we are to attend, and even work at a school where we “carry on the teaching ministry of Jesus Christ.” May we appreciate our opportunity and may we be thankful to all who make this a reality in our lives. Let us pray

 

God,

You sent forth your Son as a beacon of hope for all people. As teacher, he has given us the prime example of the importance of education. As disciples, we look to him for inspiration and strength.Thank you for the Christian Brothers who have dedicated their lives in service to Bishop Kelley. Thank you for the teachers and administrators who sustain our school today. Thank you for the parents who have given support and witness to the importance of Catholic education in their daily lives. Thank you for the students who work hard to further their education. Bless the many alumni and friends who advance our mission. May we continue to be a place that carries out the teaching ministry of your Son, through Christ our Lord, Amen.

 

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Friday, February 1st - Alan Kendrick ‘19

We hear in Romans chapter 5 versus 3-5  “More than that, we rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God's love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.”

 

Obstacles. Obstacles are a part of everybody's lives. Whether they be small obstacles: you have a hard test you didn’t study for, you didn’t get enough sleep, or you don’t have a clean school shirt so you don’t have a uniform for school. To big obstacles: you are struggling with your relationship with God or you make poor decisions during the weekend. Look at obstacles like this. You are on a path to God, and on this path you encounter a big roadblock, an obstacle that lies between you and God. You have two choices when you encounter these roadblocks between you and God, you can turn away and give up or you can face this roadblock head on and find a way around it to continue on to your path of God. God will give you these challenges to test you and to make you into a stronger person and a stronger follower of Him. He will not give you anything that you cannot handle, trust in Him because he knows what he is doing because in the end when you have that relationship with God you will be much happier than you would if you were to turn away and give up.

 

Let us pray.

 

Dear God, thank you loving us unconditionally. You see the good in us even when we cannot see it in ourselves. Thank you for challenging us. Give us the strength to continue onto the path to you and to not to grow weary or be roadblocked by the everyday, earthly struggles we face. I ask that you continue to help us on the path to you. In your name we pray, AMEN.

 

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Monday, February 4th - Parker Ross ‘19

Ecclesiastes 11:9 says, “Rejoice, young man, while you are young, and let your heart cheer you in the days of your youth.”

 

At this time in our lives, life feels like an endless road stretching on and on. Taking this time that God has given to us for granted is the easiest and most natural thing to do. Because so many hundreds and thousands of our days seem to stretch ahead of us, we tend to not reflect on this very day or any day for that matter. Each and everyday is a gift to be opened and treasured. In the day to day business of school, sports, jobs, and friends, it is up to us to stop and look at the gift and decide how to spend it. Take the time to appreciate the good things that surround us and the energy and enthusiasm that comes with being young.

 

Let us pray,

Loving God, you are the endless giver of gifts. Thank you for this day and the days to come. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

 

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Wednesday, February 6th - Davis Woodliff ‘19

Nagasaki, Japan, is familiar to Americans as the city on which the second atomic bomb was dropped, immediately killing over 37,000 people. Three and a half centuries before, 26 martyrs of Japan were crucified on a hill, now known as the Holy Mountain, overlooking Nagasaki. Among them were priests, brothers, and laymen, Franciscans, Jesuits, and members of the Secular Franciscan Order. Brother Paul Miki, a Jesuit and a native of Japan, has become the best known among the martyrs of Japan. While hanging upon a cross, Paul Miki preached to the people gathered for the execution: “The sentence of judgment says these men came to Japan from the Philippines, but I did not come from any other country. I am a true Japanese. The only reason for my being killed is that I have taught the doctrine of Christ. I thank God it is for this reason I die. After Christ’s example I forgive my persecutors. I do not hate them. I ask God to have pity on all, and I hope my blood will fall on my fellow men as a fruitful rain.”

 

Today, a new era has come for the Church in Japan. Although the number of Catholics is not large, the Church is respected and has total religious freedom. The spread of Christianity in the Far East is slow and difficult. Faith such as that of the 26 martyrs is needed today as much as in 1597.

 

Let us Pray

 

Dear God, thank you for giving us an example like St. Paul Miki. We ask that you can help us this day to not walk by fear, but by faith alone. Help us be the light in a not so bright world. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen

 

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Friday, February 8th - Mika Ramos ‘20

St. Paul of the Cross is the founder of the order of missionary priests known as the Passionists. In 1720 Paul dedicated his life to God and began to experience visions, in the last of which the Virgin Mary appeared to him. He was inspired by this vision to found a congregation devoted to the suffering of Christ on the cross. One of his most famous quotes says, “The passion of Christ is a sea of sorrows, but it is also an ocean of love.”

 

The passion of Christ refers to the sufferings our Lord endured from the agony in the garden until his death of Calvary. Just picture that for a second - imagine the pain he had to endure all because of the love he had for us. This earthly life is filled with so much sorrow. We all have struggles, burdens, and everyday crosses that we find hard to let go of. We all have things that are difficult for us to talk about. But this quote is a full embodiment of just how great our God really is. Through our struggles, we need to remember that God’s love for us an ocean wide, and that will never change no matter how many times we turn away from him. His love for us is so big that our human kinds cannot even comprehend exactly how much he love each and every one of us.

 

Let us pray, Lord, thank you for another beautiful day. Thank you for our school, faculty & staff, and for all the students that have the blessing of attending here. We thank you for your countless blessing and grace. & we especially thank you for the ocean of love that you have for us. Help us to have a better understanding of the love that you give us, and guide us in times of trial. Help us to give any struggles or burdens all to you Father God, and look to you always. Help us to know and love you in the way that you love us so fully and relentlessly. We ask this through Christ, our Lord. Amen.

 

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Monday, February 11th

From today’s Gospel for Mass, we hear from Mark:  “As they were leaving the boat, people immediately recognized him.”

 

People immediately recognized Jesus.  There was no hesitation. But why? Jesus didn’t look any different.  He was called a great teacher, and maybe even a wise prophet, but why did they immediately recognize him?  Perhaps it is because they were looking with the eyes of faith. The people heard stories of this man named Jesus, who cured lepers and gave sight to the blind.  They believed he could cure their sick and because of their faith, many were cured.

 

How many times do we miss seeing God because we focus on worldly things, or do we have to search in order to find him in a certain situation. We probably all have those times when we feel as if God is hiding from us, but if we only open the eyes of our hearts, we would see him at work in our lives, because He gives us the opportunity to see him multiple times each day.  Some may call them coincidences, but some, including me, believe that those times are the hand of God guiding us and revealing himself to us.

 

While God does work miracles that cause some to believe him, he also works in many small ways, showing us his care when a stranger smiles at us as we are walking down the hall  or when someone holds the door open as we walk through. He reveals his beauty and majesty when we pause for a moment and watch the sunrise early one morning. And most of all, whenever we behold an image of Christ hanging upon the cross, he whispers softly into our hearts.  “I love you THIS much.” Let us pray.

 

Dear Lord,

Thank you for your love and the many ways you reveal yourself to us each day. Help us to open the eyes of our hearts and see you at work in our daily lives, we ask this through Christ our Lord,  Amen.

 

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Tuesday, February 12th - Ava Olmedo ‘20

I am obsessed with planning and organizing every day of my life.  All I could think about last week was my dentist appointment on Friday, the ACT on Saturday, and confirmation class on Sunday.  It may not seem like a big deal to all but when I overly plan my life, I get extremely stressed out. If my life does not go according to my plan, I don’t feel like I’ve achieved my goals.  If you know me I am an extreme overachiever whether it's with my schedule, school, debate, or even how I’m going to spend time with my pet pig. Every single teacher that has had me knows I am obsessed with my grades and if you have not had me I warn you, I ask A LOT of questions.  But something very strange happened to me yesterday as I was attempting to follow my schedule. I realized God did not care if I was able to fully achieve my day or prove I could handle everyday life tasks. The only thing God cares about is if I am going to be what he intends for me to be.  God doesn’t expect you to make an A on every single test or be able to follow your plans. So I ask you, Bishop Kelley, to stop and realize life is full of obstacles and new adventures and every time you attempt one of those, God is always with you.

 

Let us pray.

 

Dear God, as we go through life attempting to overcome our obstacles, help us to be mindful that although the path is not always perfect, that we remember you always have the best in mind for us.  Help us to keep moving toward you so we might each be all that you intend for us to be. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

 

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Wednesday, February 13th - Zack Lissau ‘19

Today, we pray for the Repose of the Soul of Dorothy Koliha. Mrs. Koliha is the Grandmother of Senior Ashley D. Simpson. We pray for peace and consolation for the SImpson family. We also pray for 4 Special Intentions.

 

In certain regions of South Africa, when someone does something wrong, he is taken to the center of the village and surrounded by his tribe for two days while they speak of all the good he has done. They believe each person is good, yet sometimes we make mistakes, which is really a cry for help. They unite in this ritual to encourage the person to reconnect with his true nature. The belief is that unity and affirmation have more power to change behavior than shame and punishment. This is known as Ubuntu- humanity towards each other. Perhaps we could all learn a little something from this ritual and incorporate it into our actions with one another.

 

Let us pray.

 

Heavenly Father,

Thank you for giving us free will. We all make mistakes, help us to not judge others by their mistakes, rather enable us to build each other up, and see the good in one another. In Jesus’ name we pray.

 

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Thursday, February 14th - Lillie Burke ‘19

Well folks, it’s Valentine’s Day. Today may evoke a lot of mixed emotions for everyone, but it is centered around one, beautiful thing: Love. We all have love. Love for our families, our friends, our pets, our teachers, our hobbies, and everything else in our lives that fills our hearts with joy. While it can be easy to feel love for different things and people, it’s sometimes not as easy to show this love; and sometimes, simple, everyday words and gestures don’t seem enough to express an emotion so deep. Fortunately, however, we have the perfect example of love to look to: Jesus. Jesus loved each and every one of us with everything inside him — so much so that he gave up his life so that we could be happy. That is the true meaning of love: the giving of oneself for the betterment of another. Now, I’m not telling you to go out and give up your life for somebody today, but, Bishop Kelley, I am challenging you to do this: tell someone you love them; remind someone how much they mean to you; and most of all, love with all your heart, just as Jesus loves us.

 

Let us pray.

 

Lord, thank you for the gift of love. We ask that you help us to love deeply and fully, just as you feel for us. We ask this through Christ, our Lord, amen.

 

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Wednesday, February 20th - Darrel Thomas ‘19

One morning, after he had finished his meditation the old man opened his eyes and saw a scorpion floating helplessly in the water. As the scorpion was washed closer to the tree, the old man quickly stretched himself out on one of the long roots that branched out into the river and reached out to rescue the drowning creature. As soon as he touched it, the scorpion stung him, instinctively the man withdrew his hand. A minute later after he regained his balance, he stretched himself out again on the roots to save the scorpion. This time the scorpion stung him so badly with its poisonous tail that his hand became swollen and bloody and his face contorted with pain. At that moment a passerby saw the old man stretched out on the roots struggling with the scorpion and shouted. “Hey, old man, what's wrong with you? Only a fool would risk his life to save such an ugly and evil creature. Don't you know you could kill yourself trying to save that ungrateful scorpion? The old man looked into the stranger's eyes. He calmly said, “my friend just because it is the scorpion's nature to sting that does not change my nature to save”.

 

Looking at this story, we can all relate to one of the characters. Some of us are like the old man who is quick to give a helping hand. Others are like the scorpion who lash out at those trying the help. And some of us are like the passerby who is quick to judge others. Today ask your self which one of these characters are you? PAUSE for a long 3 count.

 

Let us pray.

Dear God. Help us to find ourselves. Guide us to become a better version of ourselves so that we may grow closer to you. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

 

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Friday, February 22nd

Today, the Church celebrates the Chair of St. Peter. The Chair of Saint Peter symbolizes the special mission of Saint Peter and his successors, the popes, to shepherd Christ’s flock, keeping the Church united in faith and charity. It signifies also the teaching authority of the Pope. Since the Pope is the Bishop of Rome and, as such, he is the Pastor of the universal Church.

 

As we celebrate the Feast of the Chair of Saint Peter, we remember the words of Jesus to Simon: “You are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my Church”. Jesus gave him a unique mission as the leader of the Twelve, a mission passed on to the Pope who heads the College of Bishops, who are the successors of the apostles. He gave Peter and his successors “the power of the keys”, that is, “the authority to govern the house of God, which is the Church”. And it is for that reason today, that we celebrate the Church of St. Peter,. Let us pray:

 

Lord Jesus Christ, Head of the Church, who told St. Peter that the gates of hell would not prevail against the Church you founded, confirm and strengthen us in our faith, that we may confess you ever more fervently, who live and reign with God the Father in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God forever and ever, Amen.

 

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Tuesday, February 26th - Lillie Burke ‘19

Stress. This word has only 6 letters and 1 syllable, and yet it holds a whole lot of power. Stress — especially in high school — seems to follow us everywhere. With each day comes new worries and new problems that we each have to face — whether it be with family, friends, school work, or personal problems, it feels like there is always something that we have to worry about. I’m sure many of you, like me, find yourselves wishing there was something that could instantly take away all of our problems. Now, While there isn’t a magical machine that can immediately relieve our worries, there is someone who can. If you thought that 6 letter word I mentioned earlier was powerful, get ready for this 3 letter one. God. God has the power to overcome anything and everything — and fortunately for us, that includes our burdens. All we have to do is talk to him. Ask Him for help, to relieve us of all our worries. God suffered on the cross for us so that we could be happy and healthy. That is what He wants for us. If we let go of the temporary and focus on His eternal plan for us, suddenly, our problems don’t seem as big as we once thought. The stress we feel now may be strong, but I promise you, God is stronger.

 

Let us pray,

 

God, help us to remember that You are with us always to guide us through the stresses of life. As this quarter comes to a close, and as we get busier and busier approaching the end of the year, remind us that all we need is Your love to power through. We ask this through Christ, our Lord, Amen.

 

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Wednesday, February 27th - Celeste McAtee ‘19

In his first letter to the Thessalonians, St. Paul asks his readers to pray without ceasing.  This is one of the most quoted bible verses, but it seems like such an impossible demand. We all live busy lives, and God often becomes an afterthought that we set aside--if we have time.  Perhaps I am the most guilty of this. However, as Father Webb told me once, God does not so much ask that we cut out specific chunks of our day for Him, but rather that we incorporate Him into all that we do.  I’m no Bible scholar, so I cannot definitively say what this quote means, but I believe that it serves as a reminder to live our lives in a way that praises God, and keep our love for Him burning at all times. A question we must all find the answer to is this: how can we personally glorify God with our daily actions?  It will be different for everybody, but if each of us strives to praise God with whatever we do, we will be one step closer to praying without ceasing.

 

Let us pray: God, we thank you for your Love.  We praise You and we ask that you help us understand how we may serve You better.  We ask this in Your name. Amen.

 

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Wednesday, February 27th - Celeste McAtee ‘19

Jeremiah 29:11 states “For I know the plans I have for you, plans to prosper you, not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”

 

It is often difficult for us to recognize the plans God has for us. When life throws obstacles our way, we ask “why me?” instead of asking “what is God’s plan in all of this?”  What we need to realize is that even the hard times are part of a bigger, more important plan. God makes no mistakes, and it is in these difficult times that God teaches us to trust him. He often puts us through hard times in order to teach us something, like a parent would teach their child a lesson. The things He puts us through are important for him to grow us in a way that he sees fit.  If we lean on God and completely trust in him during turbulent times in our lives, he reveals his plans to prosper us, not to harm us, and to give us a hope and a future.

 

Dear Lord,

Help us to realize that you have a greater plan for us. That even in hard times, you know exactly what you are doing. Give us the strength to lean on you in these hard times and to know that you love us eternally. We ask this through Christ our Lord, Amen.

 

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Friday, March 1st - Mia Walker ‘19

It is often difficult for us to recognize the plans God has for us. When life throws obstacles our way, we ask “why me?” instead of asking “what is God’s plan in all of this?”  What we need to realize is that even the hard times are part of a bigger, more important plan. God makes no mistakes, and it is in these difficult times that God teaches us to trust him. He often puts us through hard times in order to teach us something, like a parent would teach their child a lesson. The things He puts us through are important for him to grow us in a way that he sees fit.  If we lean on God and completely trust in him during turbulent times in our lives, he reveals his plans to prosper us, not to harm us, and to give us a hope and a future.

 

Dear Lord,

Help us to realize that you have a greater plan for us. That even in hard times, you know exactly what you are doing. Give us the strength to lean on you in these hard times and to know that you love us eternally. We ask this through christ our lord, amen.

 

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Wednesday, March 6th - Parker Ross ‘19

Ash Wednesday marks the first day of the 40 days of Lent, a six-week period dedicated to prayer, fasting, and reflection in preparation for the great celebration of Easter. Lent is a time to refocus and to re-enter a place of truth. It is here where we find our true identity. Ash Wednesday is the best way to begin a season which calls us into self-examination as well as self-denial, into deeper contemplation about the mystery and grace of God's mercy, and towards more radical giving towards those most in need of comfort and hope. Today during Mass you will have the opportunity to receive ashes. And as you receive do, you will be reminded of Genesis 3:19 “From dust you are, and to to dust you shall return.” The ashes symbolize the dust from which God made us.  Wearing the ashes throughout the day is also a visible symbol of penitence. It is important to remember that today is a day of penitential prayer and fasting as we prepare for the lenten season.

 

Let us pray…

Dear God, as we enter this holy season, we pray that you would send the holy spirit upon us that we might prepare ourselves for these days of lent and utilize them to grow closer to You. We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.