Summer Math

Read below for math packets and more information about summer math assignments. 

Pre-Algebra
 
Algebra 1
 
Algebra 1 A
 
Algebra 1 Honors
 
Geometry and Geometry A
 
Fall Algebra 1  Q3& Q4 (for Sophomores)

Your summer math packet will be emailed to you by June 1st; check your BK email.

 

Algebra 2

 

Algebra 2 A

Your summer math packet will be on MyMathLab; you will receive an email by June 1st notifying you how to sign up. 

 

Algebra 2 Honors
 
Algebra 3
Intro to Statistics (Quarter Class)

There is no summer math packet for this course.

 

AP Statistics
 
Trig & Trig with PreCalculus 

 

Concurrent PreCalculus

There is no summer math packet for this course.

 

Pre-Calculus Honors 

Your summer math packet will be on MyMathLab; you will receive an email by June 1st notifying you how to sign up. 

 

Calculus Honors
 
AP Calculus AB & BC

Your summer math packet will be on MyMathLab; you will receive an email by June 1st notifying you how to sign up. 


Summer Reading

9th Grade
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English 9 (Grammar and Composition)

1 book required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a quiz and a writing assignment on the first day.

All students are required to read Refugee, by Alan Gratz.

“JOSEF is a Jewish boy living in 1930s Nazi Germany. With the threat of concentration camps looming, he and his family board a ship bound for the other side of the world . . .ISABEL is a Cuban girl in 1994. With riots and unrest plaguing her country, she and her family set out on a raft, hoping to find safety in America . . .MAHMOUD is a Syrian boy in 2015. With his homeland torn apart by violence and destruction, he and his family begin a long trek toward Europe . . .All three kids go on harrowing journeys in search of refuge. All will face unimaginable dangers -- from drownings to bombings to betrayals. But there is always the hope of tomorrow. And although Josef, Isabel, and Mahmoud are separated by continents and decades, shocking connections will tie their stories together in the end.  This action-packed novel tackles topics both timely and timeless: courage, survival, and the quest for home.”    --Amazon

Questions:  awalker@bishopkelley.org

 

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English 9A

1 book required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a quiz and a writing assignment on the first day.

All students are required to read Flowers for Algernon, by Daniel Keyes.

“Oscar-winning film Charly starring Cliff Robertson and Claire Bloom-a mentally challenged man receives an operation that turns him into a genius...and introduces him to heartache.”--Amazon

Questions:  awalker@bishopkelley.org, khendricks@bishopkelley.org

 

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English 9 Honors

1 book required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a quiz and a writing assignment on the first day.

All students are required to read All the Light We Cannot See,  by Anthony Doerr.

“Marie-Laure lives with her father in Paris near the Museum of Natural History, where he works as the master of its thousands of locks. When she is six, Marie-Laure goes blind and her father builds a perfect miniature of their neighborhood so she can memorize it by touch and navigate her way home. When she is 12, the Nazis occupy Paris and father and daughter flee to the walled citadel of Saint-Malo, where Marie-Laure’s reclusive great-uncle lives in a tall house by the sea. With them they carry what might be the museum’s most valuable and dangerous jewel. 

In a mining town in Germany, the orphan Werner grows up with his younger sister, enchanted by a crude radio they find. Werner becomes an expert at building and fixing these crucial new instruments, a talent that wins him a place at a brutal academy for Hitler Youth, then a special assignment to track the resistance. More and more aware of the human cost of his intelligence, Werner travels through the heart of the war and, finally, into Saint-Malo, where his story and Marie-Laure’s converge.” --Amazon

Questions:  kscribner@bishopkelley.org


10th Grade
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English 10

1 book required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a quiz and a writing assignment on the first day.

All students are required to read Catch Me If You Can, by Frank Abegnale

“Frank W. Abagnale, alias Frank Williams, Robert Conrad, Frank Adams, and Robert Monjo, was one of the most daring con men, forgers, imposters, and escape artists in history. In his brief but notorious criminal career, Abagnale donned a pilot's uniform and copiloted a Pan Am jet, masqueraded as the supervising resident of a hospital, practiced law without a license, passed himself off as a college sociology professor, and cashed over $2.5 million in forged checks, all before he was 21. Known by the police of 26 foreign countries and all 50 states as "The Skywayman", Abagnale lived a sumptuous life on the lam - until the law caught up with him.”--Amazon

Questions:  khendricks@bishopkelley.org

 

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English 10A

1 book required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a quiz and a writing assignment on the first day.

All students are required to read Catcher in the Rye, JD Salinger

“The hero-narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an ancient child of sixteen, a native New Yorker named Holden Caufield. Through circumstances that tend to preclude adult, secondhand description, he leaves his prep school in Pennsylvania and goes underground in New York City for three days.”--Amazon

Questions:  tparks@bishopkelley.org

 

 

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English 10 Honors

2 books required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a quiz and a writing assignment on the first day.

All students are required to read:

  1.  Killers of the Flower Moon, by David Grann
  2. To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

Questions:  cmguire@bishopkelley.org

 


11th Grade
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English 11

1 book required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a quiz and a writing assignment on the first day.

All students are required to read A Long Way Gone:  Memoirs of a Boy Soldier,  by Ishmael Beah.

“This is how wars are fought now by children, hopped up on drugs, and wielding AK-47s. In the more than 50 violent conflicts going on worldwide, it is estimated that there are some 300,000 child soldiers. Ishmael Beah used to be one of them. How does one become a killer? How does one stop? Child soldiers have been profiled by journalists, and novelists have struggled to imagine their lives. But it is rare to find a first-person account from someone who endured this hell and survived. In A Long Way Gone, Beah, now 26 years old, tells a riveting story in his own words: how, at the age of 12, he fled attacking rebels and wandered a land rendered unrecognizable by violence. By 13, he’d been picked up by the government army, and Beah, at heart a gentle boy, found that he was capable of truly terrible acts. This is a rare and mesmerizing account, told with real literary force and heartbreaking honesty.”--Amazon

Questions:  mblazek@bishopkelley.org

 

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English 11A

1 book required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a quiz and a writing assignment on the first day.

 

All students are required to read Educated, by Tara Westover.

 

“Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent. When another brother got himself into college, Tara decided to try a new kind of life. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home.”--Amazon

 

Questions:  kscribner@bishopkelley.org, or mblazek@bishopkelley.org

 

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Honors British and World

2 books required.  Assignment required.

 

***Avoid books published by Create Space on Amazon.  Choose a book with a legitimate publisher.***

 

 1.  ALL students read two books.  ALL students read Wuthering Heights and The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.

Wuthering Heights – by Emily Bronte (ALL students)

  • A brutal tale of love and hatred, of stormy passions and vengeance, this novel shocked Victorian England and is now considered a masterpiece.   

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly – by Jean-Dominique Bauby (ALL students)

  • This modern memoir is by the editor of Elle magazine; he suffered a severe stroke, could only communicate by blinking one eye, and dictated this celebration of life.

 

2.  ANNOTATE as you read (mark passages of interest, underline, take margin notes, look up words, note characterization, imagery, foreshadowing, rhetorical or literary devices or strategies, etc.). Choose one noteworthy passage from each book, photocopy it, and put it in a composition notebook with your detailed annotations in the margins.  

 

3.  STUDY both works in preparation for a quiz on the first day of class.  Be sure you can articulate the meaning of each work as a whole. Bring the two books and the composition notebook on Day One of class for your first assignment.  

 

Questions:  cyanik@bishopkelley.org

 

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AP Language and Composition (2nd and 3rd Quarter)

AP Language and Composition (for both 2 quarter and 3 quarter classes)

 

***Avoid books published by Create Space on Amazon.  Choose a book with a legitimate publisher.

 

I. Texts: All students will complete the assignments below. Students must check with the teacher BEFORE reading a book not on this list to gain approval for substitutions. Students should not reread a book they have already read. 

 

• One Longer Work - Students will read the text below or one of comparable value 

• Educated by Tara Westover 

• One Shorter Work - Students will read the text below or one of comparable value. 

• Peace Like a River by Lief Enger

 

 II. Deadline: All summer reading project work is due the first day of class at 4:00 p.m. All written work must be submitted in electronic format only. No paper copies will be accepted. Submit work as Microsoft file attachments to your teacher: emorgan@bishopkelley.org or jfranz@bishopkelley.org

 

 III. Grades: Students will receive a grade for each of the summer projects, each worth 100 points, the novel Educated for the first quarter the student is in the class and Peace Like a River for the second quarter the student is in the class. All work is due the first day of class. Summer reading work will not be part of tests or assessments during the school year; in other words, students are encouraged to complete the assignments early in the summer and needn’t worry about forgetting aspects for class assessments. 

 

IV. Assignment: 

• For both the books Educated and Peace Like a River, students must complete one of the following options or one of equal merit (approved by the teacher prior to beginning it): 

• Reading Discussion Group: A discussion group will meet on the following dates to discuss either of the texts. Students can come to a discussion group once they have read the novel. Students must be present in Room B-11 at the start time to be allowed into the Discussion Group. Date options are: 

• July 23, 2020; 3:00 p.m. 

• September 17, 2020; 3:15p.m. 

• December 3, 2020; 3:15 p.m. 

• Test: Write a test with at least 30 objective questions plus minimally ten “thought” questions. Students must include the answers to the questions. 

• Quotation Journal: Students can keep a quotation journal that includes at least 30 representative quotes from the entire text with the page numbers. The journal should have reflections that demonstrate reactions to the quotes, not restatements or summaries of the quotes, and must include a portion of the quote in the reflections. Students must demonstrate through the presentation an understanding of the entire novel. 

• Artistic: Students can develop a creative art work of visual, choral or instrumental nature which demonstrates a particular theme or character. The art work must be submitted along with a 10-15 minute discussion with the teacher about the work. Students must demonstrate through the piece an understanding of the entire novel. 

• Motif/Character Essay: Students may choose one strong theme or character in the text then explain in an essay how the author develops that motif or character within the novel and how the motif/character ties into the theme of the novel as a whole. This essay should include specifics from the text and be at least 1000 words. 

 

Questions:  emorgan@bishopkelley.org, jfranz@bishopkelley.org 

 


12th Grade
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English 12

1 book required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a class discussion and writing assignment on the first day.

Students are to read The Last Lecture, by Randy Pausch.

" ‘We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand.’" ( Randy Pausch)

A lot of professors give talks entitled "The Last Lecture". Professors are asked to consider their demise and to ruminate on what matters most to them. And while they speak, audiences can't help but mull the same question: What wisdom would we impart to the world if we knew it was our last chance? If we had to vanish tomorrow, what would we want as our legacy?”--Amazon

Questions:  jsutton@bishopkelley.org 

 

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English 12A - Composition

1 book required; no assignment required.  Be prepared for a class discussion and writing assignment on the first day.

 

Students are to choose ONE of the following books:  

  1. The Glass Castle, by Jeanette Walls    OR

     2.   Unbroken, by Lauren Hillenbrand    OR

     3.  Killers of the Flower Moon, by David Grann

 

Questions:  jsutton@bishopkelley.org 

 

 

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English 12A - Literature

1 book required. Assignment required. 

 

***Avoid books published by Create Space on Amazon.  Choose a book with a legitimate publisher.

All students choose ONE of the following novels:

 

  • Slaughterhouse-Five  by Kurt Vonnegut  

    • Vonnegut’s postmodern novel combines an anti-war agenda with science fiction as Vonnegut spins the tale of Billy Pilgrim, a traumatized World War II veteran who believes he was kidnapped by benevolent aliens. Often considered Vonnegut’s masterpiece, this novel employs dark humor and a non-linear plot.  It is entertaining, quirky, and challenging! 

OR

 

  • A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway

    • Hemingway’s famous novel of World War I is a first person story of an American ambulance driver who falls in love with a beautiful nurse after being wounded on the Italian front.  Hemingway’s signature style – journalistic, straightforward, unadorned prose – accentuates the personal tragedy of the protagonist against the backdrop of the larger tragedy of the war.  This novel is one of Hemingway’s best and one of the most famous novels about the First World War. 

 

2.  MARK TEXT for quotes that reveal character and themes.  Choose one significant passage from the book, photocopy it, and put it in a composition notebook with your detailed annotations in the margins.  

3.  STUDY in preparation for a quiz on the first day of class.  Be sure you can articulate the meaning of the work as a whole. Bring the book and the composition notebook on Day One of class for your first assignment.

4. If you choose to read both novels, you may earn some bonus points! 

Questions: khendricks@bishopkelley.org

 

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AP English Literature

3 Books Required.   Assignment required.

 

***Avoid books published by Create Space on Amazon.  Choose a book with a legitimate publisher.***

 

Welcome to AP Literature!  This handout explains your summer reading assignments – please complete these by the first day of first quarter.  Purchase your own books if possible, and READ WITH A PEN IN HAND –always!  

 

First, get a new Composition Notebook – you will need it for summer reading and for class.  Put your name in the box on front, and decorate it.  Paste a favorite work of art on the front page or create your own artwork for page one if you’d rather.

 

Second, read Tim O’Brien’s famous Vietnam War novel The Things They Carried, a modern classic that explores the transformative power of story-telling and the soul-wrenching impact of the Vietnam War on the psyches of characters. I love this book!  Mark up your book as you read, especially paying attention to O’Brien’s use of metafiction, his consideration of the relationship between story-truth and reality.  In your Comp Notebook: O’Brien’s narrator discusses the redemptive power of storytelling.  Note two passages that illustrate the point, and one that is good for characterization, by photocopying the three passages and annotating them.  

 

Third, read Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Adichie grew up in Nigeria and her work has been translated into thirty languages; this is her first novel and I love it!  It’s a fascinating look at family conflict and culture clash, as well as a great study of IRONY, as you will discover. Mark up your book.  In your Comp Book:  Note two passages that show irony and one passage that’s good for characterization, by photocopying the three passages and annotating them.  

 

Fourth (optional), for beginning of the quarter EXTRA CREDIT read Stephen King’s memoir entitled On Writing, an excellent and entertaining story of King’s life and a guide to good writing practices.  Annotate the book thoroughly as you read, and list your five favorite King writing tips on the inside cover.

 

Bring all these books plus your Comp Book to class on Day One.   I look forward to seeing you in August!  

 

Questions:  cyanik@bishopkelley.org

 

Expand Content
AP Language and Composition (2nd and 3rd Quarter)

***Avoid books published by Create Space on Amazon.  Choose a book with a legitimate publisher.

 

I. Texts: All students will complete the assignments below. Students must check with the teacher BEFORE reading a book not on this list to gain approval for substitutions. Students should not reread a book they have already read. 

• One Longer Work - Students will read the text below or one of comparable value 

• Educated by Tara Westover 

• One Shorter Work - Students will read the text below or one of comparable value. 

• Peace Like a River by Lief Enger

 

II. Deadline: All summer reading project work is due the first day of class at 4:00 p.m. All written work must be submitted in 

electronic format only. No paper copies will be accepted. Submit work as Microsoft file attachments to your teacher: emorgan@bishopkelley.org or jfranz@bishopkelley.org

 

III. Grades: Students will receive a grade for each of the summer projects, each worth 100 points, the novel Educated for the first quarter the student is in the class and Peace Like a River for the second quarter the student is in the class. All work is due the first day of class. Summer reading work will not be part of tests or assessments during the school year; in other words, students are encouraged to complete the assignments early in the summer and needn’t worry about forgetting aspects for class assessments. 

 

IV. Assignment: 

• For both the books Educated and Peace Like a River, students must complete one of the following options or one of equal merit (approved by the teacher prior to beginning it): 

• Reading Discussion Group: A discussion group will meet on the following dates to discuss either of the texts. Students can come to a discussion group once they have read the novel. Students must be present in Room B-11 at the start time to be allowed into the Discussion Group. Date options are: 

• July 23, 2020; 3:00 p.m. 

• September 17, 2020; 3:15p.m. 

• December 3, 2020; 3:15 p.m. 

• Test: Write a test with at least 30 objective questions plus minimally ten “thought” questions. Students must include the answers to the questions. 

• Quotation Journal: Students can keep a quotation journal that includes at least 30 representative quotes from the entire text with the page numbers. The journal should have reflections that demonstrate reactions to the quotes, not restatements or summaries of the quotes, and must include a portion of the quote in the reflections. Students must demonstrate through the presentation an understanding of the entire novel. 

• Artistic: Students can develop a creative art work of visual, choral or instrumental nature which demonstrates a particular theme or character. The art work must be submitted along with a 10-15 minute discussion with the teacher about the work. Students must demonstrate through the piece an understanding of the entire novel. 

• Motif/Character Essay: Students may choose one strong theme or character in the text then explain in an essay how the author develops that motif or character within the novel and how the motif/character ties into the theme of the novel as a whole. This essay should include specifics from the text and be at least 1000 words. 

 

Questions:  emorgan@bishopkelley.org, jfranz@bishopkelley.org 


 

Expand Content
Honors British and World

2 books required.  Assignment required.

 

***Avoid books published by Create Space on Amazon.  Choose a book with a legitimate publisher.***

 

 1.  ALL students read two books.  ALL students read Wuthering Heights and The Diving Bell and the Butterfly.

Wuthering Heights – by Emily Bronte (ALL students)

  • A brutal tale of love and hatred, of stormy passions and vengeance, this novel shocked Victorian England and is now considered a masterpiece.   

The Diving Bell and the Buttlerfly – by Jean-Dominique Bauby (ALL students)

  • This modern memoir is by the editor of Elle magazine; he suffered a severe stroke, could only communicate by blinking one eye, and dictated this celebration of life.

 

2.  ANNOTATE as you read (mark passages of interest, underline, take margin notes, look up words, note characterization, imagery, foreshadowing, rhetorical or literary devices or strategies, etc.). Choose one noteworthy passage from each book, photocopy it, and put it in a composition notebook with your detailed annotations in the margins.  

 

3.  STUDY both works in preparation for a quiz on the first day of class.  Be sure you can articulate the meaning of each work as a whole. Bring the two books and the composition notebook on Day One of class for your first assignment.  

Questions:  cyanik@bishopkelley.org